Northwestern University

Nov
12
Tue 12:30 PM

Electoral Violence in Democractizing States, Leonardo Arriola, Political Science, Berkeley

When: Tuesday, November 12, 2013
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM  

Where: Scott Hall, Room 212
601 University Place  
Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: Faculty/Staff - Student - Public

Contact: Program of African Studies   (847) 491-7323

Group: Program of African Studies

Category: Lectures & Meetings

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Description:

*Part of International Education Week*

The Program of African Studies and the Political Parties Working Group present:

Electoral Violence in Democractizing States

Leonardo Arriola, Political Science, University of California at Berkeley

Abstract: This paper examines the relationship between patronage politics and electoral violence in unconsolidated democracies — the set of countries most susceptible to such violence. Despite the adoption of formal democratic institutions in these countries, patronage continues to serve as an informal mechanism for accommodating the demands of political and economic elites. Drawing on an original cross-national dataset of electoral violence from 1985 to 2005, the authors show that the corruption associated with patronage politics can inhibit the onset of electoral violence in unconsolidated democracies. The authors find that corruption has a greater impact on the likelihood of electoral violence than either the institutional or sociological factors commonly cited in the extant literature.  

Bio: Leonardo R. Arriola is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on electoral politics, ethnic politics, and political violence in African countries. He has conducted field research in Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, and Senegal. He is author of Multiethnic Coalitions in Africa: Business Financing of Opposition Election Campaigns (Cambridge University Press, 2012). His research has appeared in journals such as Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, and World Politics. He currently serves as the Vice Chair of the African Politics Conference Group (APCG).