Jun
4
Wed 6:30 PM

Artists and the Art of Life in 20th Century South Africa

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When: Wednesday, June 4, 2014
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM  
Where: , 2315 N. Kenmore Ave., room 310
DePaul University
Chicago, IL
Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students
Contact: Program of African Studies   (847) 491-7323
Group: Program of African Studies
Category: Lectures & Meetings
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Red Lion lecture co-sponsored with the University of Chicago African Studies Workshop and the Center for Black Diaspora, DePaul

Artists and the Art of Life in 20th Century South Africa

Daniel Magaziner, History, Yale University

DePaul University, 2315 N. Kenmore Ave., room 310 

Bio: Daniel Magaziner is Assistant Professor of History at Yale University. His first book, The Law and the Prophets: Black Consciousness in South Africa, 1968 - 1977, was published in 2010. He is currently writing an intellectual history of art education in 20th century South Africa, tentatively entitled The Art of Life in South Africa. A 1999 BA graduate of Northwestern University, he enjoys college sports unionization and the Wisconsin Badgers. (You can take the last sentence out if it's too jokey)

Abstract: Artists and the Art of Life in South Africa considers the experience of art education under apartheid by exploring the history of the school for the training of African art teachers, between 1952 and 1982. By delving into the material and intellectual conditions under which art students worked, the paper considers the possibilities for enriching, creative life under apartheid, beyond the oft-told narrative of the struggle and cultural politics. At its core, it is a meditation on the practice and perils of optimism under apartheid, exploring how teachers and their students used art history and art practice to contest the wider society in which they lived. Apartheid was real and powerful, however, and its material and social limits militated against art teachers' efforts. The paper closes by following one of their number beyond South Africa, as he sought to apply the lessons of art to the manufacturing of post-colonial African society.