Apr
10
Thu 12:30 PM

Colloquium: Andrea Doucet, Brock University, Canada

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When: Thursday, April 10, 2014
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM  
Where: Parkes Hall, Room 222
1870 Sheridan Road  
Evanston, IL 60208 map it
Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public
Contact: Julia A Harris-Sacony   +1 847 491 2698  
Group: Sociology Department
Category: Lectures & Meetings
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Andrea Doucet presents:

"Genealogies and choreographies of care: Re-thinking gender divisions of domestic labor as a conceptual configuration."

Andrea Doucet is a Canadian sociologist and writer. She is Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Brock University, and holds the Canada Research Chair in Gender, Work and Care. She is also the editor of the academic journal Fathering.
Andrea Doucet has published widely on themes of gender/work/care, changing fatherhood, masculinities, parental leave policies, embodiment, reflexivity, ‘responsible knowing’, and knowledge construction processes. Her book Do Men Mother? (University of Toronto Press) was awarded the 2007 John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book Award from the Canadian Sociology Association. Andrea approaches her teaching and research from an eclectic interdisciplinary perspective and background; she has degrees in political theory and creative writing (York), international development studies (Carleton), and a PhD in social and political sciences (Cambridge University, funded as a Commonwealth Scholar). Her research on theories, practices, and ontologies of care has been influenced by her co-parenting of three daughters; her work on methodologies, epistemologies and knowing processes began thirty years ago when she spent nearly six years as a participatory research facilitator, working mainly for the United Nations Development Program in water supply and sanitation projects in Central and South America.
Andrea is currently exploring and/or writing about: feminist materialisms; embodiment; affective inequalities; fathers and parental leave; fathering and masculinities; care and social justice; visual research methods; entanglements of care, work and consumption; performativity and boundary-making in concepts and methods; and intersections between sociology and fiction.