Northwestern University

May
7
Wed 7:00 PM

The 2014 Jeremiah and Helen James Lecture

When: Wednesday, May 7, 2014
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM  

Where: Scott Hall, Guild Lounge
601 University Place  
Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Cynthia Beth   (847) 491-5402

Group: Anthropology Department

Category: Academic

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Description:

"Brain Drain: Foreign Experts in the Heartland of the Assyrian Empire"

Wednesday, May 7th from 7:00pm - 8:30pm in the Guild Lounge of Scott Hall, 601 University Place. Reception to follow.

Free and open to the public. No Tickets or reservations required.

For more information, please visit: www.anthropology.northwestern.edu or call 847-491-5402

Karen Radner, Professor of Ancient Near Eastern History at University College London since 2005, was trained as a cuneiform philologist and archaeologist at the universities of Vienna and Berlin. Before joining the UCL faculty she held positions in Helsinki and Munich. She is an internationally distinguished authority on the cultural history of Mesopotamia, in particular at the time of the Assyrian Empire (9th to 7th century BCE). In addition, she has served as the field epigrapher of excavations in Syria, Turkey, and Iraq. A prolific scholar, Professor Radner has published or co-edited ten books and dozens of articles in scholarly publications. Professor Radner’s research has centered closely on the correspondence preserved in cuneiform records from the Assyrian royal centers at Nimrud and Nineveh, the detailed publication of which has been the aim of the State Archives of Assyria project headquartered at the University of Helsinki. From 2008-12 she directed a research project funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Helsinki and the University of Pennsylvania, on “Mechanisms of Communication in an Ancient Empire: The Correspondence between the King of Assyria and His Magnates in the Eighth Century BC.” The team maintains a web resource called “Assyrian Empire Builders: Governors, Diplomats and Soldiers in the Service of Sargon II, King of Assyria” (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/sargon/). She has also published cuneiform archives from other Assyrian centers located in what are now Syria, Turkey, and Iraq.

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