Northwestern University

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Nov
3
Fri 12:00 PM

Strategies of Insurgent Diplomacy: Evidence from Iraqi Kurdistan

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When: Friday, November 3, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Iszy Licht   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

International diplomacy is a ubiquitous feature of insurgent politics because it is intrinsically linked to how groups pursue third-party political and military support. However, although war-time diplomacy is central to insurgent politics, scholars still cannot explain the substantial and puzzling variation in insurgent diplomatic strategies over time. This talk examines when and why rebel groups focus their diplomatic attention on and solicit support from certain international actors over others. This framework is applied to the international diplomacy of the Iraqi Kurdish liberation movement from 1958 to 1990.

Morgan Kaplan is a Buffett Institue Postdoctoral Fellow who researches the international politics of rebellion with a focus on how insurgent groups use international diplomacy to solicit third-party support. He received his MA and PhD is Political Science at the University of Chicago and was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School. His research also examines intra-insurgent politics, international security, and state formation. The empirical focus of his work is on the Middle East, with a specialization in Kurdish and Palestinian politics.

The Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. This series promotes dialogue on scholarship and develops a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Due to space constraints, we will not admit attendees once the space reaches capacity.

Nov
10
Fri 12:00 PM

The Shape of a Global History of AIDS

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When: Friday, November 10, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Iszy Licht   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Co-Sponsor(s):
Program of African Studies

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

How might the shape of a history of AIDS help us to rethink processes of globalization? This talk, inspired by a new wave of critical AIDS scholarship, seeks to answer this question by tracing the lived realities of the epidemic in the Global South and Global North. It does so by exploring both the global governance of AIDS and the local particularities of AIDS epidemics, activism, and state interventions in such key sites as South Africa, Uganda, the United States, Haiti, Cuba, Brazil, and the United Kingdom.

Patrick Kelly is a Buffett Institute Postdoctoral Fellow with a doctorate in History from the University of Chicago. He researches and teaches broadly across modern global history, and is particularly interested in how and why people, ideas, and diseases cross national borders. This interest shaped his first book, Sovereign Emergencies: Latin America and the Making of Global Human Rights Politics (Cambridge, 2018), which examines the intersection of Latin American and global human rights politics since the 1970s. 

The Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. This series promotes dialogue on scholarship and develops a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Due to space constraints, we will not admit attendees once the space reaches capacity.

Nov
17
Fri 12:00 PM

Interpreting Indigeneity Through Bolivian Lucha Libre

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When: Friday, November 17, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Iszy Licht   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

Under Bolivia’s first Indigenous-identified president, Indigenous people have made social gains. As a result, debates about who qualifies as “authentically Indigenous” have become more pronounced. Through ethnographic research, Nell Haynes approaches the shifting ideologies and discourses on indigeneity in Bolivia by looking at lucha libre, a form exhibition wrestling.

In the early 2000s, a group of women wrestlers dubbed themselves the “cholitas luchadoras,” and perform wearing clothing associated with urban Indigenous women. For some fans, they represent Indigenous women’s empowerment, while others feel they use indigeneity as a “gimmick” that exemplifies a lack of respect toward Indigenous women. Haynes uses these competing interpretations of the “cholitas luchadoras” to understand the ways that indigeneity has become a site of contestation in Bolivia in recent years, speaking more broadly to how racial subjectivities emerge, persist, and shift within particular social contexts.

Nell Haynes is a cultural and linguistic anthropologist who focuses on the changing nature of indigeneity within global systems of economics, politics, art, and popular culture. Haynes focuses on the ways in which "authentic indigeneity" shifts as forms of self-expression and ways of identifying inevitably combine the local and the global.

The Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. This series promotes dialogue on scholarship and develops a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Due to space constraints, we will not admit attendees once the space reaches capacity.