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Sep
28
Thu 12:00 PM



Eating One’s Friends: Fiction as Argument in Bioethics - Tod Chambers

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When: Thursday, September 28, 2017
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM  

Where: Robert H Lurie Medical Research Center, 1st floor, Searle Seminar room, 303 E. Superior, Chicago, IL 60611 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Bryan Morrison   312.503.1927

Group: Medical Humanities & Bioethics Lunchtime Montgomery Lectures

Category: Lectures & Meetings

More Info

Description:

The Master of Arts in Medical Humanities & Bioethics program presents

a Montgomery Lecture

with

Tod Chambers, PhD

Associate Professor, Medical Education

Faculty, Medical Humanities & Bioethics Graduate Program

Member, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine



Eating One’s Friends: Fiction as Argument in Bioethics



In this presentation it is argued that fiction does not merely represent the world but contra to the view of most bioethicists, provide arguments through that representation. In order to illustrate, examples of speculative fiction are examined to reveal how their literary defamiliarizations of cannibalism argue for particular views concerning the species divide.

Oct
5
Thu 12:00 PM

Flash(y) Bioethics: Five-Minute Takes on Five Topics - MH&B Faculty

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When: Thursday, October 5, 2017
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM  

Where: Robert H Lurie Medical Research Center, 1st floor, Searle Seminar room, 303 E. Superior, Chicago, IL 60611 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Bryan Morrison   312.503.1927

Group: Medical Humanities & Bioethics Lunchtime Montgomery Lectures

Category: Lectures & Meetings

More Info

Description:

The Master of Arts in Medical Humanities & Bioethics program presents

A Montgomery Lecture:

Flash(y) Bioethics: Five-Minute Takes on Five Topics

Come join us for a fun introduction to our faculty and our field! Our MA students have come up with 5 topics for us explore in a pithy 5 minutes or less, providing a sampling of the diversity of issues engaged by the medical humanities and bioethics, and the breadth of the disciplinary approaches we bring to them.  Here’s a preview of who will be there, and what they’ve been asked to take on:

Catherine Belling (Literature): Trauma-informed care

Katie Watson (Law): Race as a social construct

Megan Crowley-Matoka (Anthropology): Medical costs: women vs. men

Sarah Rodriguez (History): Doctors as patients

Tod Chambers (Religious Studies/Philosophy): Medical research on prison populations

Oct
12
Thu 12:00 PM

Wilkie Collins and the Health Benefits of Leisure-Reading - Hosanna Krienke

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When: Thursday, October 12, 2017
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM  

Where: Robert H Lurie Medical Research Center, 1st floor, Searle Seminar room, 303 E. Superior, Chicago, IL 60611 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Bryan Morrison   312.503.1927

Group: Medical Humanities & Bioethics Lunchtime Montgomery Lectures

Category: Lectures & Meetings

More Info

Description:

The Master of Arts in Medical Humanities and Bioethics  program presents

A Montgomery Lecture

with

Hosanna Krienke, PhD (Northwestern University)

Research Fellow for the "Diseases of Modern Life" Project

Saint Anne's College, Oxford University

Wilkie Collins and the Health Benefits of Leisure-Reading

Why read fiction? Many thinkers have argued that fiction can teach moral and ethical lessons, or widen readers’ experiences of the world. But for some Victorian writers, including sensation novelist Wilkie Collins (1824-1889), fiction offered a vital opportunity to “do nothing.” This talk will examine how Victorians talked about the value of leisure-reading as a healthful, and even therapeutic, practice that could recuperate readers from the endemic stresses of modern life. Using Collins’s 1868 novel The Moonstone as an example, we will ultimately consider how such defenses of ‘doing nothing,’ though seemingly opposed to moral lessons, could also lead to surprising ethical insights

Oct
26
Thu 12:00 PM

The History of Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery: Marginal to Mainstream - Sarah Rodriguez

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When: Thursday, October 26, 2017
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM  

Where: Robert H Lurie Medical Research Center, 1st floor, Searle Seminar room, 303 E. Superior, Chicago, IL 60611 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Bryan Morrison   312.503.1927

Group: Medical Humanities & Bioethics Lunchtime Montgomery Lectures

Category: Lectures & Meetings

More Info

Description:

The Master of Arts in Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program presents

A Montgomery Lecture

with

Sarah Rodriguez, PhD

Faculty, Medical Humanities & Bioethics Graduate Program
Lecturer, Medical Education
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 

Lecturer, Global Health Studies
Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences
Northwestern University

Member, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 

The History of Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery: Marginal to Mainstream

Is female genital cosmetic surgery going mainstream? So queried the headline of a June 2017 news article in Ob.Gyn. News reporting on a debate held at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist’s (ACOG) annual clinical meeting in May 2017. The question of whether these surgeries were becoming mainstream was based in part on a report that 12,666 labiaplasties had been performed in 2016 in the United States, an increase of 39 percent from 2015, according to the American Society for Aesthetic and Plastic Surgery. What was driving this growth? According to Cheryl Iglesia, a physician who engaged in the ACOG debate regarding FGCS, it was the “highly-curated, and extensively retouched, images on social media and the mainstream media” which were “leaving women and men with little idea of the real range of normal female external genitalia.” Implicit in the above question is that FGCS had not been mainstream, that surgeries like labiaplasty had once been uncommon. Assuming that FGCS – surgeries that include the removal of parts of the labia, clitoral unhooding, and tightening the vagina – are ‘going mainstream,’ how did surgeries that were once considered uncommon rise to the point of possibly becoming standard surgical offerings within plastic surgery and gynecology? In this talk, I look at the trajectory of the move from an uncommon procedure to an increasingly used one, and place this move within the context of changes in medical practice.

Nov
2
Thu 12:00 PM

The Painful Puberty of Physician-Administration Relationships - Eric J. Keller

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When: Thursday, November 2, 2017
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM  

Where: Robert H Lurie Medical Research Center, 1st floor, Searle Seminar room, 303 E. Superior, Chicago, IL 60611 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Bryan Morrison   312.503.1927

Group: Medical Humanities & Bioethics Lunchtime Montgomery Lectures

Co-Sponsor(s):
Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities Events

Category: Lectures & Meetings

More Info

Description:

The Master of Arts in Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program presents

A Montgomery Lecture

with

Eric J. Keller, MA
MD Candidate
Member, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

The Painful Puberty of Physician-Administration Relationships in a Growing Healthcare Organization

Healthcare in the United States is increasingly delivered by large healthcare organizations, bringing together clinicians, healthcare administrators, and hybrid physician-administrators. Numerous op-ed pieces and scarce studies suggest that both administrators and physicians have struggled to collaborate and, at times, feel their goals are contradictory.
 
Despite various administrative efforts, including the creation of a physician engagement committee, physician engagement scores at a large academic healthcare system have remained relatively low. In response, I was asked to perform an in-depth analysis of semi-structured interviews with 40 administrators and physicians across all levels (practice managers to presidents) and specialties (colorectal surgeons to pathologists) about their roles and views of physician-administration relationships. The preliminary results revealed a dramatic disconnect between these groups that varied in interesting​ ways across various healthcare areas.

During the talk, I will propose my hypothesis regarding what drives this disconnect and what could be done to lessen it.