Northwestern University

Show past events

Apr
25
Wed 12:00 PM

Sylvester Ogbechie: The Metaphysics of Modernity: Globalism, African Art, and Ontologies of Being

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When: Wednesday, April 25, 2018
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM  

Where: 620 Library Place, Room 106, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Program of African Studies   847.491.7323

Group: Program of African Studies

Category: Lectures & Meetings

Description:

Join the Program of African Studies for our weekly lunch and lecture.

The Metaphysics of Modernity: Globalism, African Art, and Ontologies of Being

Sylvester Ogbechie, History of Art and Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara

Abstract:

The study of modern and contemporary African art is gaining global visibility in art history and several publications are now emerging that carry out sophisticated analysis of individuals, contexts and discursive practices. How do these publications frame the emergent subjects / contexts and specifically position Africa within global debates about cultural production in general? Using the works of notable pioneer modern African artists (Ben Enwonwu, Irma Stern, Gerard Sekoto, Gazbia Sirry, Iba Ndiaye and Gebre Kristos Desta), I investigate how scholars might narrate a history of modern and contemporary art that foregrounds the status of the African subject in the metaphysics of modernity.

Bio:

Sylvester Okwunodu Ogbechie (Ph.D. Northwestern University) is Professor of Art History and Visual Cultures of Global Africa at the University of California Santa Barbara. His publications include Ben Enwonwu: The Making of an African Modernist (University of Rochester Press, 2008), Making History: The Femi Akinsanya African Art Collection (Milan: 5 Continents Editions, 2011), and editor of Artists of Nigeria (Milan: 5 Continents Editions, 2012). Founder and editor of Critical Interventions: Journal of African Art History and Visual Culture, Ogbechie is a Melville J. Herskovits Award winner (2009), a Consortium Professor of the Getty Research Institute, Daimler Fellow of the American Academy in Berlin, and Senior Fellow of the Smithsonian Institution. He has also received prestigious fellowships, grants and awards for his research from the Rockefeller Foundation, Getty Research Institute, and the Institute for International Education. His research focuses on contemporary art, cultural informatics and the cultural patrimony of Africa and African Diaspora in the age of globalization.

May
2
Wed 12:00 PM

Matthew Brown - Breadlosers: Nollywood, State Television, and the Stakes of Masculine Melodrama

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When: Wednesday, May 2, 2018
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM  

Where: 620 Library Place, Room 106, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Program of African Studies   847.491.7323

Group: Program of African Studies

Category: Lectures & Meetings

Description:

Join the Program of African Studies for our weekly lunch and lecture.

Breadlosers: Nollywood, State Television, and the Stakes of Masculine Melodrama

Matthew Brown, African cultural studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Presentation Description:

The earliest Nollywood films drew from a pool of expertise within Nigeria’s massive state television network, and some films directly responded to state television narratives. In the 1990s, films focused on the subject of marriage were particularly influenced by the latest Nigerian soap operas, which explored new scripts for gender performance, often influenced by the rise of international NGOs devoted to women’s issues. Some Nollywood films extended the feminine melodramatic mode cultivated on state television, but others retaliated, developing a masculine melodramatic mode that would become typical of the industry. In this presentation, I propose that, by attending to narrative form and audiovisual aesthetics, we can better understand films that, on the surface, appear to be about the evils of greed. Instead, they make more sense as reactions to the economic foundations of gender relations. The subject of breadwinning, in particular, and the sometimes-nefarious means by which men pursue it, exposes Nollywood’s greater concern with the sharp contrast between people’s social fantasies and the conditions within which they actually live.

Bio:

Matthew H. Brown is Assistant Professor of African Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a media historian, with a focus on Nigeria, including colonial cinema, state television, and video film—otherwise known as “Nollywood.” His current book project, tentatively titled Indirect Subjects: Nollywood’s Local Address, teases apart the relationship between Nigeria’s state television network, which is the oldest and largest in Africa, and the Nollywood video boom that grew out of state television in the 1990s. Dr. Brown has also published articles and book chapters on genre theory, literature, and popular music in Africa.

May
9
Wed 12:00 PM

Carolyn & Richard Lobban: The Road to the Two Sudans and The Untold Story of Shari`a in Sudan

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When: Wednesday, May 9, 2018
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM  

Where: 620 Library Place, Room 106, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Program of African Studies   847.491.7323

Group: Program of African Studies

Co-Sponsor(s):
Institute for the Study of Islamic Thought in Africa (ISITA)

Category: Lectures & Meetings

Description:

Join the Program of African Studies for our weekly lunch and lecture.

The Road to the Two Sudans and The Untold Story of Shari`a in Sudan

Richard Lobban, professor emeritus of anthropology and African studies, Rhode Island College, and Carolyn Fleuhr-Lobban, professor emerita of anthropology, Rhode Island College

May
16
Wed 12:00 PM

Lansiné Kaba: The 1591 Moroccan Invasion of Songhay

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When: Wednesday, May 16, 2018
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM  

Where: 620 Library Place, Room 106, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Program of African Studies   847.491.7323

Group: Program of African Studies

Co-Sponsor(s):
History Department

Category: Lectures & Meetings

Description:

Join the Program of African Studies for our weekly lunch and lecture.

The 1591 Moroccan Invasion of Songhay

Lansiné Kaba, history, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Bio:

Dr. Lansiné Kaba is Distinguished Visiting Professor of History at Carnegie Mellon University at Qatar. He headed the Department of African American Studies from 1986 to 1995, and served as Dean of the Honors College from 1996 to 2001. He was President of the US /International/ African Studies Association from 1998 to 2001. He has received many awards and has lectured in many countries in Africa, Europe and the Middle East on both academic and current issues. His radio interviews and television appearances have made him a “public intellectual” in French-speaking Africa.

May
23
Wed 12:00 PM

Solomon Fikre Lemma: Formal and Non-formal Land Rights in Africa: The Ethiopian Case Study

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When: Wednesday, May 23, 2018
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM  

Where: 620 Library Place, Room 106, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Program of African Studies   847.491.7323

Group: Program of African Studies

Category: Lectures & Meetings

Description:

Join the Program of African Studies for our weekly lunch and lecture.

Formal and Non-formal Land Rights in Africa: The Ethiopian Case Study

Solomon Fikre Lemma, law, Addis Ababa University; PAS visiting scholar

Bio:

Solomon Fikre Lemma, PAS visiting scholar, has served as Dean of the College of Law and Governance Studies and Secretary of the Senate of Addis Ababa University, as well as an assistant professor at the Schools of Law of Addis Ababa and Hawassa Universities. He received his PhD, LL.M., and LL.B. degrees from the Schools of Law of the University of Warwick, Erasmus University, and Addis Ababa University, respectively. Lemma's research interests include law and development, particularly the role and potential of land, business, and property laws in tackling poverty and fostering economic development in developing countries. He has served as a UNHCR volunteer at Bonga and Fugnido Camps for Sudanese refugees in western Ethiopia, contributing to his research interest in the protection and treatment accorded to vulnerable groups such as women, children, and refugees under international and Ethiopian laws.