Northwestern Events Calendar

Apr
8
2021

Black Trans Feminism and Translatinx Citizenship

When: Thursday, April 8, 2021
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Central

Where: Online

Audience: Faculty/Staff - Student - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Siobhan LaGro  

Group: Critical Theory

Co-Sponsor: African American Studies Department
Gender & Sexuality Studies Program

Category: Academic

Description:

Join us for an event on “Black Trans Feminism and Translatinx Citizenship",  April 8th – 5:30-7:30 pm via Zoom supported by Critical Theory in the Global South, a project funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation at Northwestern University, along with the National University of Tres de Febrero (UNTREF).

*Readings are available, BUT NOT REQUIRED FOR THE EVENT. For reading materials in advance of the event email Siobhan.LaGro@northwestern.edu

Marcia Ochoa (UC Santa Cruz) and Marquis Bey (Northwestern University) will present forthcoming work. The conversation will focus on the main axes and themes that revolve around gender, Latinidad, race, and trans/queer theory from a broad perspective that will include theories from the global north and south.

Marcia Ochoa (UC Santa Cruz - Feminist Studies Department, Critical Race and Ethnic Studies, Oakes College) will present "La Ciudadanía Ingrata: Trans-Latinas, Participatción Y Pertenencia en la ausencia del Reconocimiento" and Marquis Bey (Northwestern University – Department of African American Studies and English) will present forthcoming work from Black Trans Feminism. The conversation will focus on the main axes and themes that revolve around gender, Latinidad, race, and trans/queer theory from a broad perspective that will include theories from the global north and south. Mariano López Seoane (UNTREF) will be a guest respondent.

The event will be presented in Spanish and English through simultaneous translation. 

Speaker Bios:

Marcia Ochoa: Marcia Ochoa is Associate Professor of Feminist Studies and Interim Provost of Oakes College at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Ochoa is founding advisory board co-chair of El/La Para Translatinas, a transgender Latina social justice organization in San Francisco’s Mission District. An anthropologist specialized in the ethnography of media, Ochoa is the author of Queen for a Day: Transformistas, Beauty Queens and the Performance of Femininity in Venezuela (Duke 2014), and Co-Editor Ex Oficio of GLQ: a Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (2014-2020). Their current project, Ungrateful Citizenship, documents the work of El/La Para Translatinas and the terms on which transgender women from Latin America who live in the US and Europe participate in, belong to, and are recognized by society.

Marquis Bey is Assistant Professor of African American Studies and English, and core faculty member of Critical Theory, at Northwestern University. Their work concerns black feminist theorizing, transgender studies, abolition, and critical theory. More specifically, their writing focuses on blackness and transness as paraontological postures, radical subjectivities, nonbinariness, and autotheory. Bey is the author of Black Trans Feminism, a monograph forthcoming with Duke University Press in January 2022, and is revising a contracted book entitled Cistem Failure: Essays on Blackness and Cisgender.

Guest Respondent Bio:

Mariano López Seoane is currently the director of the Master’s Program on Gender and Sexuality at UNTREF in Argentina, where he has been teaching since 2013. He also teaches Latin American literature, cultural studies and queer studies at NYU Buenos Aires. After completing a BA in History at the University of Buenos Aires, Mariano moved to NYC to study at NYU, where he earned a Master’s Degree in Latin American Studies from CLACS and a PhD in Latin American Literature from the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He has written mostly on contemporary Latin American literature and arts, with particular interest in the cultures of sexual and gender dissidents in the Americas, Latin American instances of queer studies and queer activism, and figurations of drug culture and drug related violence in Latin American narrative, film and visual arts.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of African American Studies and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program.

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