Northwestern University

Jan
13
Fri 12:00 PM

Imagining Climate Change from Noah’s Flood to The Day After Tomorrow

CANCELLED

SHOW DETAILS

When: Friday, January 13, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Jeff Cernucan   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Co-Sponsor(s):
ISEN private

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

The biblical story of Noah’s Flood served as a template for some of the very first theories of global climate change in the Scientific Revolution, and it is once again being used as a means of imagining and representing anthropogenic global climate change in the 21st century in popular media. This talk considers the historical origins of the use of flooding imagery and metaphors in contemporary climate discourse and the consequences and implications of this recycling for climate action.

Lydia Barnett (PhD, Stanford University) is a historian of early modern Europe whose work explores the intersections of science, religion, and the environment in transnational contexts. Her current book project explores the scientific imagination of global natural disasters at the turn of the 18th century.

This is part of the Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium. On Fridays during the school year, the Buffett Institute hosts Northwestern faculty and/or visiting fellows to present their current research. This forum brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. The series helps promote dialogue on scholarship and develop a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Please arrive early to get lunch and find a seat.

Jan
20
Fri 12:00 PM

An Intellectual Biography of Dao Duy Anh, 1904-1988

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When: Friday, January 20, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Jeff Cernucan   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

This talk will chronicle the intellectual history of 20th-century Vietnam as told through the biography of Đào Duy Anh, arguably the most important Vietnamese scholar of the modern period.

Haydon Cherry is a historian of modern Southeast Asia, particularly modern Vietnam. His first book, Down and Out in Saigon: Stories of the Poor in a Colonial City, 1900-1940, will be published by Yale University Press. At Northwestern University, Cherry teaches courses on the history of Southeast Asia as well as modern global history.

This is part of the Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium. On Fridays during the school year, the Buffett Institute hosts Northwestern faculty and/or visiting fellows to present their current research. This forum brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. The series helps promote dialogue on scholarship and develop a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Please arrive early to get lunch and find a seat.

Jan
27
Fri 12:00 PM

Psychological Characteristics and Longevity Across Different Countries

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When: Friday, January 27, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Jeff Cernucan   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Co-Sponsor(s):
Global Health Events

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

This research examines 15 long-term studies from several different countries to test the effect of psychological characteristics, or personality traits, on mortality risk. It also looks at whether smoking behavior accounted for those associations. This study is of unique importance because it can demonstrate if a given effect or set of effects can replicate across many studies over different countries.

Dan Mroczek (psychology) conducts research that focuses on 1) lifespan personality development 2) the influence of personality — and personality change — on physical health, mortality, and other important life outcomes.

This is part of the Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium. On Fridays during the school year, the Buffett Institute hosts Northwestern faculty and/or visiting fellows to present their current research. This forum brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. The series helps promote dialogue on scholarship and develop a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Please arrive early to get lunch and find a seat.

Feb
3
Fri 12:00 PM

Building in Urgency: Infrastructures and Law in an Authoritarian Turkey

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When: Friday, February 3, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Iszy Licht   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Co-Sponsor(s):
Keyman Modern Turkish Studies (Buffett Institute)
ISEN private

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

Hopes are high with infrastructures: They are expected to create jobs for the working class, overcome economic stagnation, and raise standards of living. But infrastructures are also central to any authoritarian project; they are used to garner political support, establish economic alliances, govern populations, and produce space. With its focus on politics of infrastructures, this talk provides an alternative lens to the rise of authoritarianism in contemporary Turkey. By looking the new legal instruments that were created to ease and accelerate infrastructure projects, this talk discusses the broader implications of infrastructural politics in governing a variety of policy realms from urban planning to counterterrorism.

Sinan Erensü is a Keyman Postdoctoral Fellow at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies, Northwestern University. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Minnesota in 2016. His research and teaching interests include political ecology and political economy; urban and rural studies; and energy, infrastructures, and the politics of dispossession. Titled Fragile Energy: Power, Nature and Politics of Infrastructure in the “New Turkey, his dissertation research explores the political work energy infrastructures do in 21st-century Turkey.

This is part of the Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium. On Fridays during the school year, the Buffett Institute hosts Northwestern faculty and/or visiting fellows to present their current research. This forum brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. The series helps promote dialogue on scholarship and develop a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Please arrive early to get lunch and find a seat.

Feb
10
Fri 12:00 PM

The Turkey/Syria Border as a Palimpsest of Sovereignty

SHOW DETAILS

When: Friday, February 10, 2017
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  

Where: 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: - Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Contact: Iszy Licht   847.467.2770

Group: Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Co-Sponsor(s):
Keyman Modern Turkish Studies (Buffett Institute)

Category: Global & Civic Engagement

Description:

This talk is about how lives of the crossers of the Syria/Turkey borderlands reconfigured a historically contingent politics of territorialization. It has two aims: First advancing a processual and historical account of border and region formation, it redefines the border as a palimpsest of sovereignty—layered and superimposed with competing cartographies of territory and their attendant regimes of mobility.

Second, based on this processual account, Emrah Yildiz shows how state-level mitigating and managing the transgressions of the border and military policing of the designation of their perpetuators as smugglers and irregular traffickers have helped historically and spatially produce the Turkey/Syria border.

Emrah Yildiz's (MENA, anthropology) work is a historical anthropology of routes of mobility in the tri-border area among Iran, Turkey and Syria. His research lies at the intersection of historiography and ethnography of borders and their states; ritual practice, visitation and pilgrimage in Islam as well as smuggling and contraband commerce in global political economy.

This is part of the Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium. On Fridays during the school year, the Buffett Institute hosts Northwestern faculty and/or visiting fellows to present their current research. This forum brings together an interdisciplinary audience to build awareness of global research on campus. The series helps promote dialogue on scholarship and develop a deeper sense of community among Buffett Institute affiliates. Each meeting lasts one hour; lunch is provided. Please arrive early to get lunch and find a seat.