Northwestern Events Calendar

Oct
17
2019

Dylan AT Miner: This Land is Always

When: Thursday, October 17, 2019
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM  

Where: Harris Hall, #108, 1881 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 map it

Audience: Faculty/Staff - Student - Public - Post Docs/Docs - Graduate Students

Cost: Free and public welcome!

Contact: Jill Mannor   847.467.3970

Group: Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities

Co-Sponsor(s):
Department of Art History

Category: Academic

Description:

This Land is Always

Co-presented with Art History, the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research, Northwestern University Native American and Indigenous Student Alliance (NAISA), and Multicultural Student Affairs

Dylan Miner (b. 1976) is an artist, activist, and scholar. He is Director of American Indian and Indigenous Studies, as well as Associate Professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at Michigan State University. Miner sits on the board of the Michigan Indian Education Council and is a founding member of the Justseeds artists collective. He holds a PhD in Arts of the Américas from The University of New Mexico and has published extensively. In 2010, he was awarded an Artist Leadership Fellowship from the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution. Miner has been featured in more than two dozen solo exhibitions. He has been artist-in-residence or visiting artist at institutions such as the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, École supérieure des beaux-arts in Nantes, Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Rabbit Island, Santa Fe Art Institute, and numerous universities, art schools, and low-residency MFA programs. His book Creating Aztlán: Chicano Art, Indigenous Sovereignty, and Lowriding Across Turtle Island was published in 2014 by the University of Arizona Press. 

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The 2019-2020 Humanities Dialogue: MEMORIALIZING

This talk is part of a year-long public conversation about commemorating, contesting, and claiming from humanistic perspectives.

What stories do monuments tell?
When is remembrance also a repression?
How does memorializing shape the present?
How do we negotiate collective and disputed memories?

Presented in partnership with multiple Northwestern departments and programs, the Memorializing Dialogue features talks by distinguished scholars and artists from different disciplinary perspectives.

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